Drag On Tape

As the concept of “Flipped Classrooms” continues to take root, teachers must find ways to more effectively use video. Frustration sets in when only 2 minutes of a 15 minute video is relevant to your lesson. We end up saddling our students with 3 or 4 full length videos just to get the appropriate content across. Drag on Tape allows you to edit YouTube videos and grab the clips that you want and splice them together. You can use the native YouTube search to find videos or cut and paste a URL. The main feature of Drag on Tape is the ability put YouTube videos together to create a mixtape of content. Instead of overwhelming them with excess, we can engage our students even further by targeting video content to meet specific needs.

Click on the picture to take you to the site:

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Iconbug.com

There was a lot of interest in the “Icon Archive” post from yesterday. I found another image and icon site that might have even more potential for educators. Icon Bug┬áprovides free images for download in a variety of formats. All images are licensed and like Icon Archive, the type of license is given for each image. The big advantage for Icon Bug is the ability to download single images. On Icon Archive, you end up downloading collections. The site design is also much cleaner without the shady looking advertising.

Click on the logo to have a look:

Icon Archive

As we teach our students to become digitally responsible, it becomes a struggle to find images that are usable under copyright law. I came across this amazing site on Twitter yesterday that will help to solve this problem. Icon Archive is an icon and image resource bank. All downloads are free and have creative commons licenses. The extent of each license is listed with the image. The quality of the images is really quite amazing.

www.iconarchive.com

The pictures below are examples of the quality that you can expect to find: